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Welcome back!

by YPU Admin on September 16, 2013, Comments. Tags: Research and study

It’s been a quiet summer on the blog, but there’s plenty to look forward to in the coming months – research case studies, subject spotlights, career insights, as well as our brand new themed blogs! 

As the academic year kicks off, the University of Manchester has begun welcoming new and returning students, bringing back the campus buzz. With new starts (and in some cases, new sun tans), we’d thought we’d use the first post of the academic year to highlight upcoming events, activities and initiatives at the University of Manchester…

STAR Lecture Series

Filmed and recorded at the University, the lectures cover a variety of subject areas and are delivered by members of our highly acclaimed academic staff. Lecture topics are all based on the national curriculum and exam syllabuses and give an insight into related research, taking the theory off the page and into practice!  It’s a fantastic opportunity to enhance current knowledge as well as learn more about university study.

Some of the upcoming lectures include:

·  The Quantum Universe – presented by Professor Jeff Forshaw, October 16th, 2013

·  The  US Civil Rights Movement – presented by Professor Louis Kushnick OBE, November 14th, 2013

·  The First World War: Imagining a United Nation – presented by Dr. Chris Godden, January 8th, 2014

More information about the STAR lectures can be found here.



SUPI (The School-University Partnerships Initiative)

Ever wondered what researchers do and what they research? Here’s a chance to find out! The University of Manchester will be organising a range of interactive activities and events to give students a first-hand experience of how cutting-edge research is done. Some of the university’s new researchers will be on hand to answer questions and demonstrate what they do.

For more information about the initiative, please look here.



Upcoming University Events

Finally, the University of Manchester holds a range of events throughout the year, which range from academic lecture, to social events. A comprehensive list of upcoming events can be found here.

From the brain, to the Bible, to badgers, to Beckham -  a busy year ahead and plenty of research activity to delve into! Be sure to keep checking the blog regularly for updates, articles and events.


Going further...

Check out the University of Manchester's YouTube Channel for feature which vary from student profiles to latest research news.

For blog entries written by our current students, click here.

Follow the University of Manchester admissions team on Twitter and like the Facebook page.

 

Focus On...Audiology

by YPU Admin on August 13, 2013, Comments. Tags: Audiology, careers, healthcare, Life Science, pathways, and study



Audiology 


Considering becoming an audiologist?

Not sure what an audiologist is? Well, if you like interacting with people, want to improve somebody’s quality of life and want a career that is people focused but also has elements of science and technology, then a degree in audiology could be just for you.


What is audiology?

Audiology is the branch of science that studies hearing, hearing related disorders, and balance. Audiologists work with people who have hearing and balance conditions, so you will get to work with people of all ages, from new-born babies to adults. Audiologists are also responsible for the patient’s management, which may include counselling and fitting of hearing aids. As the world gets more crowded, and ‘louder’, and people get older, more and more people will need help from audiologists. Just check out the figures: there are more than 10 million people in the UK with some form of hearing loss. That’s one in six of the population. There are more than 45,000 deaf children in the UK and, on average, it takes around ten years for people to seek help about hearing problems. By 2031, it is estimated that there will be 14.5 million people with hearing loss in the UK. Hearing problems are only going to get more common and that means the world needs more audiologists!


Studying audiology

There are lots of different training and education options if you want a career in audiology. You could work alongside an audiologist as an assistant, or work as a Hearing Aid Dispenser in which you would need to do a foundation degree (see http://www.bshaa.com). If you are not really sure where you want to work, but would like to see patients then you may want to study an audiology degree. Here at The University of Manchester we offer both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, which combine the practical, theoretical and clinical aspects of audiology. These courses are part of the Audiology and Deafness Group at Manchester, which is the oldest audiology department in the UK, dating back to 1919. In addition we have strong links with the NHS, where some of our courses provide placements in NHS clinics. Click here to find out the many different courses we offer. Also why not find out what one of our first years has to say about the course….here


Career Paths

Completing either an undergraduate or postgraduate degree at The University of Manchester prepares you for a career in the NHS or the independent sector. Audiologists are part of a big team and work with: speech and language therapists; teachers of the deaf; ear, nose and throat specialists; and social services. But if working in the NHS doesn’t appeal to you, there are loads more options. Graduates from our courses have found work with companies that create and dispense hearing aids or have become lecturers at universities, undertaking their own research. Others now work for hearing charities or at schools that specialise in teaching children with hearing problems. The career opportunities as an audiologist are very good and, with an ageing population, the demand for audiologists will only increase.


Our Research

One example of a research project being carried out at The University of Manchester is investigating the changes in brain activity after wearing an earplug in one ear for a short period of time. Our brains are able to compensate for a change in hearing. If you have a hearing loss, the brain will increase its activity to compensate for less sound reaching the brain. However, in some people, the brain activity will increase too much and this can lead to tinnitus, a condition where the person hears a high-pitched ringing noise (this is why the condition is also known as ‘ringing in the ears’). Little is known about what causes the brain to overcompensate and where and when these changes occur. We hope to understand more about the changes in brain activity and how it can lead to tinnitus by simulating hearing loss, which involves wearing an earplug and measuring the changes in brain activity. If we can understand more about the changes in brain activity, this could lead to a better understanding of tinnitus. If you would like to know more about our other research projects, visit our website.


Find out more about audiology

Have a look at our website for more information about Audiology at The University of Manchester.

For up-to-date news about what we do in our department and school, check out our blog.

Check out our very own Professor Chris Plack, explaining how the ear works using only the thousand most used words in the English Language.

The British Society of Audiology supports audiology across the UK and you can find out about the latest news and events from their website.

Check out The British Academy of Audiology (BAA) that supports Audiologists and provides advice on careers in Audiology. 


 

Focus On...Archaeology

by YPU Admin on May 20, 2013, Comments. Tags: archaeology, careers, history, pathways, and study


Archaeology: Digging Up the Past

Have you ever wanted to discover ancient remains in a distant land? Do you feel excitement when watching a team of archaeologists on TV reveal human bones, bronze tools, gold jewellery and pottery? Are you riveted by the details of how a Roman bathhouse worked or how an Iron Age roundhouse was built? If your answer is yes, then archaeology might just be the thing for you.


What is archaeology?

Archaeology is the scientific study and interpretation of past peoples and their lives through studying the material remains they left behind. Archaeologists look at a wide range of artefacts from large buildings and colourfully painted graves down to small clay pots, paintings, stone arrowheads, bone fragments and even pollen and seeds.

The most common way to find past artefacts is by excavating, or by doing a field survery where you collect remains that are visible on the surface. As these activities destroy the precise locations and context of the artefacts, archaeologists record, draw and photograph all information accurately for future generations. All finds are then washed, analysed and interpreted. Finally, the artefacts need to be preserved, possibly reconstructed and stored – frequently in a nearby local museum. All of this work is rarely done by archaeologists alone, but requires a team of specialists, such as geologists, botanists, osteologists, computer specialists, and conservators. Once the analysis has been completed, the findings are published in articles, books or magazines.


Studying archaeology

In order to get expertise in archaeology, an undergraduate degree is the best way to go. Here at Manchester, we offer both single honours and joint honours degrees (with Ancient History, Anthropology or History of Art). With our teaching stretching from the Neanderthals through to modern day and our research areas ranging from Europe, the Near East, Africa through to Australia, the UK and the Pacific, we offer a truly global introduction to the discipline. Our main focus at Manchester is on exploring the social dimension of the past human experience. We offer a unique combination of theoretical enquiry, a concern with the contemporary social context, and a commitment to practical field work (You can watch a video of Manchester's archaeologists here). In addition, we have strong links to the archaeological sciences at the university and to the Manchester Museum whose collections we are able to make use of in our teaching and whose staff members regularly contribute specialist lectures.


Career paths

Archaeology is one of the most varied careers as it draws on the sciences, social sciences and arts. It is also one of the most diverse subjects as it combines activity out in the field with intellectual study and scientific analysis in the laboratory. Archaeologists can be found in the private, public and academic sectors: You could find yourself working at the shovel’s edge in charge of uncovering new sites and finds. Alternatively, you might be working in a museum, designing exhibitions, talking to the public and looking after the collections. Maybe you are employed by the council in charge of providing guidance to developers. Or possibly you are working as a lecturer at university and are undertaking your own research projects throughout the year. Depending on your interests, you might find yourself working at home in Britain, on a hot island in the Mediterranean, on a lone mountain in South America or the cold expanses of Siberia. One thing is for sure: it’s a hugely rewarding career that combines painstaking discovery with stimulating interpretations about past people’s lives.

Even if you don’t see yourself pursuing archaeology as a career, it is an excellent foundation for your future that will serve you well in a wide variety of interesting careers: studying archaeology alerts you to the great diversity between people and social practices; it provides a rigorous training in evaluating evidence and ideas; it encourages the development of creative and critical thinking, verbal and written communication, and a wealth of practical and team working skills that are sought after by employers. As a subject it is challenging, intriguing, satisfying and hugely enjoyable.


The Archaeology of beer!

One recent project carried out by archaeologists (with the help of archaeology students) at Manchester has been the excavation of a Bronze Age beer production installation on Cyprus. A two by two metre domed mud-plaster structure (shown in the picture) was used as a kiln to dry malt for the production of beer three-and-a half-thousand years ago. The beers were brewed from malted barley, and fermented with yeasts produced from fruits such as grape or fig. All the ingredients have been found as carbonised seeds at the site, along with stone tools for grinding the grains and pots for heating the mixture.


Additional clues on beer production on Cyprus come from large decorated pottery bowls like the one shown in the image. You can see people grinding grain and a couple sitting relaxing drinking beer from bowls!



Find out more about archaeology…

To check out Archaeology at Manchester, go to the department's webpage

The Council for British Archaeology supports archaeology across the UK and you can find out about the latest finds, excavations and the Young Archaeologists’ Club from their website.

For up-to-date news about archaeology as well as articles about different topics, go to: http://archaeology.about.com

A recent BBC series uses planes to detect archaeology. Find out more with the ‘flying archaeologist’ blog.

BBC History has excellent website about archaeology (and some self-test quizzes).