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Wait a minute - that doesn't sound like business?!

by YPU Admin on January 24, 2020, Comments. Tags: AMBS, business, marketing, Mental Health, PhD, psychology, and university

Introduction

Hey everyone! I’m Charlotte and I’m a 1st year PhD student currently studying at Alliance Manchester Business School at the University of Manchester. My current research is focused on student mental health and help-seeking behaviours.

“Wait a minute”, I hear you say, “that doesn’t sound like business”.

And at first glance it doesn’t. I’ve had many questioning looks when I tell people I’m a marketing student studying student mental health, but that’s one of the best things about my PhD. I get to combine my passion for understanding and improving mental health with my interests in marketing and consumer behaviour.

So, sit back and I’ll tell you all.


In-depth

Before starting my PhD I studied for my undergraduate degree in Psychology and a master’s degree in Marketing. At first you might think Psychology and Marketing don’t really go together, but I’ve always been interested in why we think and behave in particular ways, and that’s exactly what Marketers try to do.

After my master’s degree I worked for 2 years at a digital marketing agency just outside of Manchester managing the day-to-day marketing activities of my clients including; branding, design for digital or print promotions, advertisements, copywriting and campaign management. As much as I enjoyed working in marketing, after a couple of years I could hear university calling my name once more. So, I applied for my PhD and the rest, as they say, is history!

But what exactly do I do?

Mental health has been studied extensively, with particular focus in areas such as health, psychology and sociology. Approaching student mental health from a marketing perspective, my research aims to better understand the motivations and decision making processes that encourage individuals to seek help for their mental health problems - or indeed why certain people avoid seeking help. By understanding these decisions better, I hope that my research can have an impact in improving the provision of university support services (and the promotion of these services) to facilitate help-seeking behaviour.

As I’m only in my first year, my work mainly involves developing my research skills and reading more about the different perspectives and disciplines researching student mental health. As a qualitative researcher, with an interest in behaviour, I’ve never been convinced by statistics alone. I’m much more interested in how individual’s create meaning as part of their experiences. Qualitative research allows me to gain a richer interpretation of experiences and behaviours, and how people interpret these behaviours. One of the best things about studying for my PhD is that as I read and learn more about my topic, my research questions change and develop.

At University, for both my undergraduate and master’s degree, the biggest challenge for me was always trying to work out what I wanted to do at the end of it. Now, studying for my PhD I hope to continue researching and stay in academia to teach the marketers and researchers of the future. It hasn’t been a straight road, but then your career doesn’t have to be - find something you enjoy learning about and career ideas start to fall into place (even if you don’t realise it at first)!

A bit further...

If you’re interested in finding out more about careers in Psychology, visit: https://www.bps.org.uk

For more information on careers in Marketing, visit: https://www.cim.co.uk

If you’d like to find out more about the courses on offer at the University of Manchester, you can visit the links here:

Psychology: https://www.bmh.manchester.ac.uk/study/psychology/

Business and Marketing: https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2020/03528/bsc-management-marketing/

The book that started to bridge the gap between Psychology and Marketing for me was Robert Cialdini’s ‘Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion’ https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Influence.html?id=5dfv0HJ1TEoC

The Drum is a website dedicated to looking at the latest trends and news in the Marketing industry. You can take a look around the website here: https://www.thedrum.com

Or if you want to know more about the current research taking place across the UK focussing on Student Mental Health, King’s College London (KCL) created a research network called SMaRteN dedicated to improving understanding of student mental health in higher education. You can visit the website here:

https://www.smarten.org.uk

 

Law and Ethics and Medicine: How do they relate?

by YPU Admin on July 21, 2016, Comments. Tags: Law, medicine, Research, university, and UoM

Introduction

Hello, my name is Jessica Azmy and I am a medical student at the University of Manchester. This year I am taking a year away from my medical studies and studying for a Masters in Healthcare Law and Ethics, before returning to my final year of medical school. I will hopefully then graduate as a doctor!

In Depth

It may seem strange to be completing a Masters at this stage and I never imagined when I started Medicine that this is something I would do. During medical school I was intrigued by the relationship between the law and medical practice because it seemed to be relevant in all areas. I often found doctors referring to what the law does and does not allow and wanted to explore this further. I am really interested in certain areas such as the law determining whether children can or cannot refuse medical treatment that doctors feel is best for them. The main aim is to consider what the law currently says and what it should say, if we lived in an ideal world. Of course doctors need to know the law to avoid being taken to court, if something goes wrong!


What the law should say comes down to fundamental questions which are captured by the ethics part of my course. For example, the reason why doctors must always ask whether we agree (consent) to medical treatment is because we are human beings that have the ability to decide for ourselves what we want. The exploration of why doctors should act in certain ways and whether it is right or wrong to take a particular course of action is a constant source of debate and there is rarely one ‘correct’ answer. This is what I like most because it makes me consider my own views and learn to argue these in a way to persuade other people to agree with my argument. Some of the areas I have considered include organ donation and whether this should or should not be a choice, whether scientists should be able to experiment on humans, and the problems arising from creating human-animal hybrids (mixture of human and animal tissue).

What’s the point?

With constant advances in science and technology creating new possibilities in healthcare there is a need to consider what we should and shouldn’t allow. How would you feel if you could choose the characteristics of your future child – their hair colour, eye colour and even intelligence? Do you think everyone should be an organ donor? Should doctors be allowed to end the life of a patient who is suffering terribly? Should doctors ever keep information from patients to prevent upsetting them? These are some of the pressing questions that ethics aims to address! The issues are often on the news making what I am studying even more relevant and interesting.

I am not sure what type of doctor I want to be in the future but the best thing about law and ethics is that it is relevant to all areas of medical practice and will hopefully help me with whatever speciality I go into. I hope to also use my Masters to teach future medical students about the law and perhaps offer advice in legal cases involving doctors.

Going further

To explore a wide range of ethical dilemmas in science visit:

http://www.beep.ac.uk/content/1.0.html

For a greater look at the ethics surrounding gene technology:

http://www.beep.ac.uk/content/457.0.html

To look at what is involved in creating human-animal hybrids (mixing human and animal tissues):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/animals/using/hybridembryos_1.shtml

Watch this video for a general introduction to ethics (not specific to science):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAuv0HujFbc

Really interesting video comparing ethics in science and arts and giving more information on why we make decisions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NO4mgCDtMXs&ebc=ANyPxKo8q0_849gLcXpPdKXw1t5vLgBlb1B-7rnzhJTjbOldWhebYT-Dpg3N7M3YTrysw2s7y3aD9RB_99TdaFjtCfkamFPsOw


 

Teaching in School vs University: Is there a difference?

by YPU Admin on November 26, 2015, Comments. Tags: Education, learning, Research, teaching, university, and UoM

Introduction

Hi, my name is Kelly and I now work in the Student Recruitment and Widening Participation department of the University of Manchester. For the past three years, I have been a student studying Psychology at the University and for the thirteen years before that, I too was propelled along the standard education pipeline (or maybe not so standard anymore) by attending first school, middle school and high school.

In Depth…

One of the main parts of my job, for the past couple months now, has been the development of an EBL project for our visiting Year 11 students. EBL stands for ‘Enquiry Based Learning’ (or Inquiry Based Learning if you’re American) and is equivalent to ‘Problem Based Learning’, which you might have heard of before. This method of teaching starts with a question, a problem or a scenario, and it is the student’s task to solve this problem, with the aid of a facilitator.

Not a teacher.

That’s great, right?

Think again.

The lack of teacher leading the way means that the road from problem to solution is less smooth, less clear, but then when in life is the answer ever clear? In this situation, you are responsible for your own learning, for figuring out your answers and where they fall into the topic of your choice. This method of independent learning is fundamental to the way students traditionally learn at university.

  1. You’re given a topic or a lecture – a foundation, so you can understand the task
  2. You are provided with resources to be used as starting points (these can be textbooks, journal articles or websites)
  3. And then you have to produce work at the end of it e.g. an essay, a report or a presentation, about what you've found out

This is what I've tried to recreate in my own EBL project for visiting Y11 students. This project is the finale to the flagship pre-16 Gateways programme, ran by the University of Manchester. Groups of school pupils visit campus year upon year, from Y7 to Y11, to find out more about the opportunities to study in Higher Education and develop new and transferable skills. In this final part of the programme, students are presented with a lecture on a case study (a Volcanic Disaster for this year). They were then sorted into groups depending on their interests and sent away (with the help of a Student Ambassador) to research that area for an hour and a half. The day finishes with each group giving a presentation on what they found and a prize is given to the group that presented the best.


This transition from teacher-led to research-led learning replicates what you would experience if you chose to study at university. When you’re at the cutting edge of your field and learning the newest knowledge being published to date, it’s highly likely that you’ll find yourself not knowing the answers, and being in the position where YOU could contribute to future knowledge, explanations and discoveries.

Throughout your early school days, you may have been taught that there’s only one right answer, and you’ll get a mark for getting that answer right. University is different. There might be some things that we THINK answer the question, but these may still be debated. Something you, or the media or the educational system take for a fact, may still actually be not so certain.

Some courses at university take advantage of this method. Medicine is taught using in many universities around the country. It works in similar to the EBL project above: all of the medics would be split off into groups with people they don’t know, they would be given a case study – perhaps a patient with a case of symptoms. It would be their job to work together to research and collaborate and figure out the causes and treatments of the case.

I believe taking part in EBL tasks early on in education has the advantage of pressing students to think outside of the box and to find their own answers; sometimes topics can be more complicated than just getting the answer right.

Going Further…

Here are some references you may find useful: